9 10 11 12
AP Computer Science Principles
Honors Math 1
Math 1
AP Computer Science Principles
Honors Math 2
Math 2
Math 3
AP Calculus AB
AP Calculus BC
AP Computer Science JAVA
AP Computer Science Principles
AP Statistics
Honors Math 3
Math 3
AP Calculus AB
AP Calculus BC
AP Computer Science JAVA
AP Computer Science Principles
AP Statistics
Applied Mathematics
Consumer Math
Functions and Modeling
Honors Math 3
Math 3
Probability and Statistics
Trigonometry

Students are required to complete 3 credits of math to graduate.  District 230 works closely with partner schools to ensure each student has a smooth and successful math transition.

Student Calculator Needs

A Graphing Calculator is required for most math courses. The required graphing calculator is the TI-84+.

Additional Math Support and Extended Courses

Division chairs, teachers and counselors work with students to determine additional supports needed in order to develop certain skills or provide additional supports to ensure students are successful in the curriculum. Extended course opportunities are prescribed to students when they have been identified as needing additional support to master the learning targets of the academic course. If a student fails a course, summer school courses may be necessary in order for students to stay on track for graduation in four years.

Senior Year Math Courses

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AP Calculus AB

Prerequisite: Honors Pre-Calculus AB with a grade of C or better or Honors Pre-Calculus BC with a grade of C or better and teacher recommendation.
Grade Level: 11-12
Semesters: 2
Credits: 1

Students will study differential and integral calculus. This course follows the College Board’s Advanced Placement curriculum and as such is extremely rigorous and fast paced. Students may receive college credit in Calculus by qualifying on an examination administered by the College Entrance Examination Board.

AP Calculus BC

Prerequisite: 11th grade – Honors Pre-Calculus BC with a grade of B and teacher recommendation, or 12th grade – AP Calculus AB or teacher recommendation.
Grade Level: 11-12
Semesters: 2
Credits: 1

Students will study differential and integral calculus with further applications to vectors, polar functions, sequences and series. This course follows the College Board’s Advanced Placement curriculum and as such is extremely rigorous and fast paced. Students may receive college credit in Calculus by qualifying on an examination administered by the College Entrance Examination Board. Students should be aware that the pace and content are by necessity greater than that of Calculus AB (AP). Students in this course may be required to complete a summer assignment to assist in retention of previously learned material.

AP Computer Science JAVA

Prerequisite: Completion of Honors Math 2 or Math 3 with a B or better or concurrent registration in Honors Math 3
Grade Level: 10-12
Semesters: 2
Credits: 1

Students will study the structured program and the syntax of computer languages. Object oriented programming techniques will be studied and implemented in all programs. This course follows the College Board’s Advanced Placement curriculum and as such is extremely rigorous and fast paced. Students may receive college credit in Computer Science by qualifying on an examination administered by the College Entrance Examination Board.

Please note that while this course is located in our math department some colleges don’t view this as a math course.  Please consult with any college where you may be applying to see if this course meets their math requirement.

AP Computer Science Principles

Grade: 9-12
Semester: 2
Prerequisite: None

The AP Computer Science Principles course is designed to be equivalent to a first-semester introductory college computing course.  In this course, students will develop computational thinking skills vital for success across all disciplines, such as using computational tools to analyze and study data and working with large data sets to analyze, visualize, and draw conclusions from trends.  The course is unique in its focus on fostering student creativity.  Students are encouraged to apply creative processes when developing computational artifacts and to think creatively while using computer software and other technology to explore questions that interest them.  They will also develop effective communication and collaboration skills, working individually and collaboratively to solve problems, and discussing and writing about the importance of these problems and the impacts to their community, society, and the world.

Please note that while this course is located in our math department some colleges don’t view this as a math course.  Please consult with any college where you may be applying to see if this course meets their math requirement.

AP Statistics

Prerequisite: Completion – Completion of Honors Math 2 or Math 3 with a B or better or concurrent registration in Honors Math 3
Grade Level: 10-12
Semesters: 2
Credits: 1

Students will be introduced to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. The four major theses presented in the course are: exploring data, planning a study, anticipating patterns and statistical inference. There is a large written language component to this class. This course follows the College Board’s Advanced Placement curriculum and as such is rigorous and fast paced. Students may receive college credit in Statistics. Students in this course may be required to complete a summer assignment to assist in retention of previously learned material.

Please note that while this course is located in our math department some colleges don’t view this as a math course.  Please consult with any college where you may be applying to see if this course meets their math requirement.

Applied Mathematics

Prerequisite: This course is for students who have successfully completed three years of math to meet the graduation requirements. Students who earn a grade of C- or better will obtain a portability code on their transcript. Grade Level: 12
Semesters: 1
Credits: .5

Students will be engaged in authentic, application based math problems that will forge connections between classroom content and students’ lives. Topics include managing personal finances, financial decision making in a variety of scenarios,using math for post secondary decisions.  The course will end with a capstone project where students will display their understanding of how to apply mathematics to their daily lives after high school.

This course meets the state requirement to allow entry into a 100 college level math class, without a STEM focus. A student needs to earn a C- or higher to meet this state requirement.

Consumer Math

Prerequisite: This course is only for students that have not successfully passed three years of math

Grade Level: 12
Semesters: 2
Credits: 1

Students will learn concepts and problem solving techniques necessary to successfully deal with consumer and career applications. Students will work on authentic, application based math problems to make connections between classroom content and students’ lives. Topics include managing personal finances and understanding financial decision making in a variety of scenarios by using math to make informed  post secondary decisions. 

Students may take one semester if needed to complete the three year graduation requirement with successful completion of 2.5 years of math. After first semester successful completion of Consumer Math, they could take an additional math transitional course in an attempt to gain the math portability code. Applied Mathematics would be the suggested second semester course.

Functions and Modeling

Prerequisite: This course is for students who have successfully completed three years of math to meet the graduation requirements. Students who earn a grade of C- or better will obtain a portability code on their transcript.
Grade: 12
Semester: 1
Credits: .5

This STEM-driven, function-based approach to introductory college algebra includes: linear,  polynomial, rational, radical, and exponential functions. Many phenomena in the world around us can be modeled with functions, so this course takes a more deliberate approach to these understandings. While this course is designed for students who intend to enter a career field of science, technology, engineering, and/or mathematics, it will also benefit students that will use similar skills (additional related careers can be found in health care, information technology, business management and administration, etc.).

This course meets the state requirement to allow entry into a 100 college level math class, without a STEM focus. A student needs to earn a C- or higher to meet this state requirement.

Honors Math 1

Prerequisite: Department Chair Recommendation
Grade Level: 9
Semesters: 2
Credit: 1

Topics include recognizing and developing patterns using tables, graphs and equations. Mathematical modeling is stressed as a methodology for approaching the solution to problems. Students will explore operations on algebraic expressions and apply mathematical properties to algebraic equations. Students will problem solve using equations, graphs and tables and investigate linear and exponential relationships, including comparing and contrasting options and decision-making using algebraic models. Topics from two-dimensional Geometry are integrated into this curriculum. This includes congruence, construction, and proof, as well as applying geometry to the coordinate plane. Instruction in the area of data analysis is introduced. Technology will be used for guided practice. Math 1 Honors also includes standards from Pre-Calculus courses so that when a students completes the Honors Math sequence they will be prepared for AP Calculus.

Honors Math 2

Prerequisite: Honors Math 1 or teacher recommendation
Grade Level: 10
Semesters: 2
Credit: 1

Honors Math 2 topics include quadratic expressions, equations, and functions; comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships from Math I. This course includes standards from the conceptual categories of Number and Quantity, Algebra, Functions, Geometry, and Statistics and Probability. The scope of Honors Math 2 is limited to quadratic expressions and functions, and some work with absolute value, step, and functions that are piecewise-defined.

In Honors Math 2, instructional time will focus on seven critical areas: (1) extending the laws of exponents to rational exponents; (2) comparing key characteristics of quadratic functions with those of linear and exponential functions; (3) creating and solving equations and inequalities involving linear, exponential, and quadratic expressions; (4) extending work with probability; (5) establishing criteria for similarity of triangles based on dilations and proportional reasoning, (6) Trigonometric identities, and (7) circles. Honors Math 1 Honors also includes standards from Pre-Calculus courses so that when a student completes the Honors Math sequence they will be prepared for AP Calculus.

Honors Math 3

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Honors Math 2 or teacher recommendation
Grade Level: 11, 12
Semesters: 2
Credits: 1

Honors Math 3 will integrate and apply the mathematics they have learned from their earlier courses. This course includes standards from the conceptual categories of Number and Quantity, Algebra, Functions(Rational, Logarithmic, Trigonometric, and Polynomial), and Geometry.  Students synthesize and generalize what they have learned about a variety of function families. They extend their work with exponential functions to include solving exponential equations with logarithms. They explore the effects of transformations on graphs of diverse functions, including functions arising in an application, in order to abstract the general principle that transformations on a graph always have the same effect regardless of the type of the underlying function. They identify appropriate types of functions to model a situation, they adjust parameters to improve the model, and they compare models by analyzing appropriateness of fit and making judgments about the domain over which a model is a good fit. The description of modeling as “the process of choosing and using mathematics and statistics to analyze empirical situations, to understand them better, and to make decisions” is at the heart of Honors Math 3.

In Honors Math 3 instructional time should focus on three critical areas:(1) expand understanding of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions;(2) expand right triangle trigonometry to include general triangles; and(3) consolidate functions and geometry to create models and solve contextual problems.

 

 

Math 1

Prerequisite:  None
Grade Level: 9
Semesters: 2
Credit: 1

Topics include recognizing and developing patterns using tables, graphs and equations. Mathematical modeling is stressed as a methodology for approaching the solution to problems. Students will explore operations on algebraic expressions and apply mathematical properties to algebraic equations. Students will problem solve using equations, graphs and tables and investigate linear and exponential relationships, including comparing and contrasting options and decision-making using algebraic models. Topics from two-dimensional Geometry are also integrated into this course including: congruence, construction, and proof, as well as applying geometry to the coordinate plane. Instruction in the area of data analysis is introduced. Technology will be used for guided practice.

 

Math 2

Prerequisites: Math 1
Grade Level: 10
Semesters: 2
Credit: 1

Math 2 topics include quadratic expressions, equations, and functions; comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships from Math I. This course includes standards from the conceptual categories of Number and Quantity, Algebra, Functions, Geometry, and Statistics and Probability. The scope of Math 2 is limited to quadratic expressions and functions, and some work with absolute value, step, and functions that are piecewise-defined.

In Math 2, instructional time will focus on seven critical areas: (1) extending the laws of exponents to rational exponents; (2) comparing key characteristics of quadratic functions with those of linear and exponential functions; (3) creating and solving equations and inequalities involving linear, exponential, and quadratic expressions; (4) extending work with probability; (5) establishing criteria for similarity of triangles based on dilations and proportional reasoning, (6) Trigonometric identities, and (7) circles.

Math 3

Prerequisite: Math 2
Grade Level 11-12
Semester: 2
Credit: 1

Math 3 will integrate and apply the mathematics they have learned from their earlier courses. This course includes standards from the conceptual categories of Number and Quantity, Algebra, Functions(Rational, Logarithmic, Trigonometric, and Polynomial), and Geometry.  Students synthesize and generalize what they have learned about a variety of function families. They extend their work with exponential functions to include solving exponential equations with logarithms. They explore the effects of transformations on graphs of diverse functions, including functions arising in an application, in order to abstract the general principle that transformations on a graph always have the same effect regardless of the type of the underlying function. They identify appropriate types of functions to model a situation, they adjust parameters to improve the model, and they compare models by analyzing appropriateness of fit and making judgments about the domain over which a model is a good fit. The description of modeling as “the process of choosing and using mathematics and statistics to analyze empirical situations, to understand them better, and to make decisions” is at the heart of this Mathematics III course.

In Math 3 instructional time should focus on three critical areas:(1) expand understanding of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions;(2) expand right triangle trigonometry to include general triangles; and(3) consolidate functions and geometry to create models and solve contextual problems

Probability and Statistics

Prerequisite: This course is for students who have successfully completed three years of math and meet the requirements to take a 100 level college math class.
Grade Level: 12
Semesters: 1
Credits: .5

Students will be introduced to modern statistics and probability theory and the basic statistical ideas needed in such areas as sociology, business, economics, ecology, education, medicine, psychology, and mathematics. This course includes study in both descriptive and inferential statistics.

Trigonometry

Prerequisite: This course is for students who have successfully completed three years of math and meet the requirements to take a 100 level college math class.

Grade Level: 12
Semesters: 1
Credits: .5

Students will explore right triangle trigonometry, as well as trigonometric graphs and various trigonometric identities. This course is more geared toward students pursuing a career in a STEM-based field where they may find use of more rigorous mathematics. This semester course, combined with a semester course of Functions and Modeling, constitutes an academic Pre-Calculus course.